Wednesday, April 23, 2014

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OCEAN ACIDIFICATION NEWS

Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

Marine biologists are searching for evidence of what our oceans will look like if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. Thirty percent of the carbon dioxide, or CO2, released into the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, leading to a process called acidification. Shellfish and coral reefs are particularly impacted, according to Jason Hall-Spencer of Plymouth University. “We’ve never put this much carbon dioxide into the ocean before,” he said. “It’s never happened before in Earth’s history. Not this quickly.” NBC’s Ann Curry reports.

Sunday, April 06, 2014
Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
NOAA and partners release first federal ocean acidification strategic research plan

NOAA and partners release first federal ocean acidification strategic research plan

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification outlines multi-disciplinary research on impacts

NOAA and its partners released the first federal strategic plan to guide research and monitoring investments that will improve our understanding of ocean acidification, its potential impacts on marine species and ecosystems, and adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Sea Change: Food for Millions at Risk

Sea Change: Food for Millions at Risk

Ocean Acidification BY: CRAIG WELCH, The Seattle Times

A remote Indonesian village highlights the threats facing millions of people who depend on marine creatures susceptible to souring seas and ocean warming.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Arctic Ocean Acidification

Arctic Ocean Acidification

Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme

The report by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program on Arctic Ocean Acidification was recently released and identifies the risks to Arctic ecosystems, including indigenous tribes and Arctic residents.

Sunday, December 01, 2013
How shifting ocean chemistry threatens Maine

How shifting ocean chemistry threatens Maine

BY: MICK DEVIN, special editorial to Bangor Daily News

An environmental crisis is looming on the marine horizon. Ocean acidification threatens Maine’s inshore fisheries, growing aquaculture industry and the jobs that rely on them.

The culprit in this story is carbon dioxide. It’s changing the chemistry of the ocean and endangering shellfish like lobster, oysters, clams and sea urchins.

Monday, October 28, 2013
Acidification of oceans threatens to change entire marine ecosystem

Acidification of oceans threatens to change entire marine ecosystem

BY: LARRY PYNN, Vancouver Sun

Ocean acidification due to excessive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is threatening to produce large-scale changes to the marine ecosystem affecting all levels of the food chain, a University of B.C. marine biologist warned Friday.

Chris Harley, associate professor in the department of zoology, warned that ocean acidification also carries serious financial implications by making it more difficult for species such as oysters, clams, and sea urchins to build shells and skeletons from calcium carbonate. Acidic water is expected to result in thinner, slower-growing shells, and reduced abundance. Larvae can be especially vulnerable to acidity.

Friday, October 25, 2013
Sea Change

Sea Change

Ocean acidfication, the lesser-know twin of climate change, thereates to scramble marin life on a scale almost too big to fathom BY: CRAIG WELCH, The Seattle Times

NORMANBY ISLAND, Papua New Guinea — Katharina Fabricius plunged from a dive boat into the Pacific Ocean of tomorrow. 

She kicked through blue water until she spotted a ceramic tile attached to the bottom of a reef. 

A year earlier, the ecologist from the Australian Institute of Marine Science had placed this small square near a fissure in the sea floor where gas bubbles up from the earth. She hoped the next generation of baby corals would settle on it and take root. 

Fabricius yanked a knife from her ankle holster, unscrewed the plate and pulled it close. Even underwater the problem was clear. Tiles from healthy reefs nearby were covered with budding coral colonies in starbursts of red, yellow, pink and blue. This plate was coated with a filthy film of algae and fringed with hairy sprigs of seaweed. 

Instead of a brilliant new coral reef, what sprouted here resembled a slimy lake bottom. 

Isolating the cause was easy. Only one thing separated this spot from the lush tropical reefs a few hundred yards away. 

Carbon dioxide.

Friday, September 13, 2013
California Ocean Protection Council Announces West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Science Panel

California Ocean Protection Council Announces West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Science Panel

Sacramento, CA

California and Oregon are joining forces to help address ocean acidification and hypoxia, a West Coast-wide thereat to our shared marine and coastal ecosystem.  The California Natural Resources Agency , on behalf of the California Ocean Protection Council (OPC), today signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the state of Oregon to jointly sponsor a high-level science panel to help address the issue of ocean acidification and hypoxia.

Thursday, August 29, 2013
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