Saturday, May 23, 2015

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OCEAN ACIDIFICATION NEWS

PMEL Director to Speak at Sound Conversations 2015

PMEL Director to Speak at Sound Conversations 2015

By: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

On Thursday, April 2nd, NOAA/PMEL Director Chris Sabine will discuss NOAA’s role in detecting ocean acidification and measuring community vulnerability to understand risk during Sound Conversations at the Seattle Aquarium.  TheSeattle Aquarium hosted the 3rd phase of theWendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE aimed at developing affordable and accurate pH sensors. As a leader in ocean acidification research and detection, NOAA/PMEL scientists are providing validation measurements for the XPRIZE contest. 

Wednesday, April 01, 2015
The Galápagos Islands: A Glimpse into the Future of Our Oceans

The Galápagos Islands: A Glimpse into the Future of Our Oceans

BY: NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

A study of Galápagos’ coral reefs provides evidence that reefs exposed to lower pH and higher nutrient levels may be the most affected and least resilient to changes in climate and ocean chemistry.

Thursday, January 22, 2015
Turning the High Beams on Ocean Acidification: NOAA Funds Shellfish Farmers and Scientist To Expand Pacific Coast Monitoring With $1.4 Million Over Three Years

Turning the High Beams on Ocean Acidification: NOAA Funds Shellfish Farmers and Scientist To Expand Pacific Coast Monitoring With $1.4 Million Over Three Years

BY: NOAA

NOAA is providing a grant of $1.4 million over three years to help shellfish growers and scientific experts work together to expand ocean acidification (OA) monitoring in waters that are particularly important to Pacific coast communities such as in oyster hatcheries and coastal waters where young oysters are grown. 

Shellfish growers, hatchery owners and scientists will work together to strengthen their understanding of and ability to adapt to the impacts of ocean acidification on the Pacific Coast of the US, including Alaska. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, which are being absorbed by the ocean, are causing a change in ocean chemistry which has already been detected along this coast. 

Monday, December 15, 2014
Ocean Acidification Concerns, Information to be aired at Northeast Stakeholders Workshop

Ocean Acidification Concerns, Information to be aired at Northeast Stakeholders Workshop

The Northeast Coastal Acidification Network (NECAN) is hosting an “Ocean and Coastal Acidification Stakeholder Workshop” on December 10, 2014 at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine. The purpose is to inform and learn from fishermen, clam harvesters, aquaculturists, and coastal water quality volunteer programs their concerns and state of knowledge about ocean and coastal acidification (OCA). 

Thursday, December 04, 2014
Waterways Program Features the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

Waterways Program Features the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

BY: NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

The latest episode of the educational television series “Waterways” features coral research conducted by NOAA scientists in the Florida Keys. As the global ocean becomes more acidic, NOAA is documenting these changes and their impact on organisms like corals. The first part of the episode entitled “Ocean Acidification & Tortugas Tide Gauge”   features AOML researchers discussing how they study this process and the high tech tools they use to monitor and describe changes in coral growth due to a more acidic ocean.

Monday, December 01, 2014
Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems

Oceans may be acidifying faster today than in the past 300 million years BY: NSF Press Release

With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and moving into marine ecosystems, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic.

The oceans may be acidifying faster today than at any time in the past 300 million years, scientists have found.

To address concerns for acidifying oceans, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded new grants totaling $11.4 million through its Ocean Acidification program. The awards are supported by NSF's Directorates for Geosciences and Biological Sciences.

Tuesday, September 09, 2014
Innovative Lab Gauges Acidification Effects on Marine Snails

Innovative Lab Gauges Acidification Effects on Marine Snails

Carbon dioxide scrubbers like those that clean the air in space stations.

Precision monitors and instruments.

Industrial parts used in wastewater treatment.

Michael Maher’s job was to assemble the pieces into one of the most sophisticated ocean acidification simulation systems yet developed. Ocean acidification is the decrease in ocean pH due to its absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere – carbon dioxide forms an acid when it dissolves in water.

Monday, September 08, 2014
WHOI Scientists Receive $1 Million Grant from MacArthur Foundation

WHOI Scientists Receive $1 Million Grant from MacArthur Foundation

Project will develop science-based climate change adaptation solutions for coastal communities BY: WHOI

Rapid climate change and an increasing range of climate impacts are already being felt along our coasts, and new research suggests that U.S. Northeast coastal waters may be more vulnerable to climate change and ocean acidification than previously thought.

How will communities prepare for and mitigate the impacts of these changes?

A team of scientists with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have received a $1 million grant from The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to develop science-based climate change adaptation solutions for coastal communities and to partner with organizations to help communities anticipate change and to prepare to adapt.

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
A wake-up call in Alaska about ocean acidification and coastal communities

A wake-up call in Alaska about ocean acidification and coastal communities

BY: JEREMY MATHIS & STEVE COLT

A new study shows, for the first time, that ocean acidification is driving changes in waters vital to Alaska’s commercial fisheries and traditional subsistence way of life.

As one of our planet’s most under-recognized challenges, ocean acidification is emerging because the sea is absorbing increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. CO2 concentrations are now higher than at any time during the past 800,000 years, and the current rate of increase is likely unprecedented in history. Ocean acidification is literally causing a sea change, threatening the fundamental health of ocean and coastal waters from pole to pole. And, as the new study indicates, the implications for Alaska may be profound.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Increased Ocean Acidity Puts Alaska Fisheries At Risk, Study Says

Increased Ocean Acidity Puts Alaska Fisheries At Risk, Study Says

By BECKY BOHRER, Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The release of carbon dioxide into the air from power plant smokestacks to the tailpipe on your car could pose a risk to red king crab and other lucrative fisheries in Alaska, a new report says.

Ocean water becomes more acidic when it absorbs carbon dioxide released by human sources, such as the burning of fossil fuels. Increased ocean acidification could harm important Alaska commercial and subsistence fisheries and communities that rely heavily on them, according to the new research aimed at spurring discussion on how to address the changes.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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